Student Resources

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Student Resources


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Conducting a Job Search

Taking the necessarily steps to find the righ job while in the midst of an overwhelming  clincial schedule can seem like a monumental task. Yes, searching  for a job is a time consuming process but you can make it less daunting if you apporach it with the following knowledge

1.  Be Organized

Understand that it can take 6-9 months to find the right job. With this in mind

  • Develop a timeline and work back from the date you’d ideally like to be employed by
  • Set aside specific time on a regular basis to your search
  • Develop a method to keep track of your search- websites that you identified potential jobs on, referrals to potential employers, externships you pursued etc.  Once your search is under way keep track of contacts made, followups, new referrals etc.
  • Focus your job search by prioritizing your requirements (geographical, specific kind of practice).
  • Conduct informational interviews to help you ascertain what it is that you are looking for in a job
  • Do all this and you will land the right job (not just any job)

 

  2.  Use your networks

    Research shows that a large number of jobs are not advertised.  The best way to tap into this ‘hidden job market’ is to utilize your networks. 

  • Contact practices that you did externships at.  If there are no openings ask them for a referral to another potential employer
  • Explore the Cornell Veterinary externship/opportunity block database available online to identify potential contacts to explore.
  • Utilize the Cornell veterinary alumni network for potential opportunities or referrals.  Dr. Sweet can work with the Office of Alumni Affairs and Development to identify alumni that fit your criteria.
  • Ask faculty for referrals.  Their networks of colleagues and former students are extensive

 

3. Tailor your Resume and Cover letter

  • Write and rewrite your resume and have it reviewed by Dr. Sweet
  • Research the practice when possible to tailor your resume and cover letter. Explore the practice website or speak with colleagues who may be from that region and may know about the practice. Explore the externship database to see if Cornell students have externed there and what they had to say about the experience.

 

4.   Follow Up

  • Don’t wait to hear from the practice regarding an interview.  Follow up to inquire about the status of your application. 
  • If there are no openings or if they have already filled the position thank them for their time and ask for a referral to other potential employers.  If any of those referral work update your referee on your status and thank them for their help
  • If you are invited to interview, follow up within 24-28 hours of the interview with a hand written thank you note.