ORAL PROPYLENE GLYCOL TOXICITY IN RUMINANTS AND HORSES
 
Description    Oral propylene glycol is used to treat ketosis in ruminants but can be toxic. Propylene glycol is not used routinely in horses, but resembles mineral oil and can be administered by mistake. Signs develop less than an hour after administration.
 
Species   Bovine, Equine, Caprine, Ovine
 
Signs   Abdominal distention, Abnormal breath odor, Ataxia, Circling, Colic, Coma, Cyanosis, Decreased amount of stools, absent feces, constipation, Decreased borborygmi, Diarrhea, Dullness, Dysmetria, Dyspnea, Excessive salivation, Inability to stand, Increased borborygmi, Increased respiratory rate, Seizures or syncope, Sweating, Unusual or foul odor, stools, feces
 
References   Dawson DR. Toxins and Adverse Drug Reactions Affecting the Equine Nervous System. Vet Clin N A Eq Pract 2011;27:507 [Web Reference]
Bertram HC. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based investigation on propylene glycol toxicosis in a Holstein cow. Acta Vet Scand 2009;51:25 [Web Reference]
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