GEIGERIA POISONING IN RUMINANTS
 
Description    Plants of the genus GEIGERIA in Africa cause a disease characterized by vomiting of rumen contents and stiffness. There are lesions of both skeletal and esophageal muscle fibers, with vacuolation and other signs of focal degeneration. Most common in sheep, but also occurs in goats and cattle. Sheep develop signs after about 3 weeks of grazing.
 
Species   Bovine, Caprine, Ovine
 
Signs   Abdominal distention, Agalactia, Anorexia, Ataxia, Bloat in ruminants, Coughing, Dullness, Dysmetria, Dysphagia, Exercise intolerance, Gagging, retching, Generalized lameness or stiffness, Generalized weakness, Grinding teeth, Inability to stand, Ingesta in nasal passage, Paraparesis, Reluctant to move, Sudden death, Tetraparesis, Trembling, Tremor, Underweight, poor condition, thin, emaciated, unthriftiness, ill thrift, Vomiting or regurgitation, Weight loss
 
References   Snyman LD. Changes in sheep oesophageal diameter and function during GEIGERIA ORNATIVA (vermeerbos) poisoning and subsequent recovery. J South Afr Vet Assn 2008;79:179
Copyright © 2017 Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine