OLEANDER, FOXGLOVE, LILY-OF-THE-VALLEY POISONING IN DOGS AND CATS
 
Description    Oleander, Foxglove, Lily-of-the-Valley, and other members of the families APOCYNACEAE, LILIACEAE, and SCROPHULARIACEAE contain cardioactive glycosides similar to digitalis.
 
Species   Canine, Feline
 
Signs   Absent p waves, Arrhythmia, Ataxia, Atrial fibrillation, Bradycardia, Cold skin, Diarrhea, Dullness, Dysmetria, Excessive salivation, First degree atrioventricular heart block, Generalized weakness, Hypothermia, Inability to stand, Increased respiratory rate, Mydriasis, Pain on external abdominal pressure, Pale, Second degree atrioventricular heart block, Seizures or syncope, Sinus arrest, Sudden death, Tachycardia, Tenesmus, Third degree, complete, atrioventricular heart block, Trembling, Tremor, Ventricular fibrillation, flutter, Vomiting or regurgitation, Weak pulse
 
References   Pao-Franco A. Successful use of digoxin-specific immune Fab in the treatment of severe Nerium oleander toxicosis in a dog. J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2017;27:596 [Web Reference]
Cortinovis C. Epidemiology of intoxication of domestic animals by plants in Europe. Vet J 2013;197:163 [Web Reference]
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