Wendy English  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Marjory Brooks  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Linda Mittel  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Kelsey  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Jen Nagashima  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Bald eagle  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Bruno  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Clinical Pathology  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Robin Davisson  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


image  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Laboratory  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Veterinary Techinician  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Veterinary Techinician  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


X-ray  

Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)


Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW)

The Committee on the Status of Faculty Women (CSFW) was established in 2005 in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the recommendation of the General Committee due to a perceived need for a committee dedicated to the concerns and welfare of women faculty. The charge of the Committee is to evaluate issues of importance to faculty women, provide advice to various parties as to courses of action, and propose initiatives that foster career development for women faculty. Since its inception, the Committee has lived up to its charge; the dedicated and enthusiastic members (both women and men) have served as a sounding board for women faculty, have been responsible for several initiatives that have assisted all faculty, and have advanced causes of importance to women in the College. These efforts have been facilitated by collaboration with CU-ADVANCE, a valuable University resource for the Committee. A few of the CSFW’s achievements are listed below:

  • Ensured accessibility and suitability of convenient lactation rooms across the college, including renovation of existing rooms
  • Establishment of an ongoing and evolving mentoring program for faculty
  • Organization of a seminar series and workshops, dealing with topics like mentoring, effective interactions in the workplace, and avoiding gender bias in academic searches
  • Invited high profile women to the College, such as Deans of other veterinary colleges
  • Initiation of an informal mingling event for early-career and new faculty
  • Hosted receptions for women faculty and academic staff, including residents and interns
  • Nominated women faculty or alumni for various awards (e.g. Cook Award, Daniel Elmer Salmon Award for Distinguished Alumni Service)
  • Creation of this website, profiling women in the college
  • Collection of data on the following: Changes over time in numbers of women faculty in various titles, college climate (2006), response to implementation of the mentoring program (2010) (data available at Internal Resources)

 

Profiles of Women in the College of Veterinary Medicine

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Highlighted news items

Including Women on Convening Committees Increases Women Speakers at Scientific Meetings:  article from Article from American Society for Microbiology
Women Seriously Underrepresented in Academic Publishing
Goldilocks syndrome: how women leaders have to walk a fine line to achieve credibility
Women in science: Women's work A special section of Nature finds that there is still much to do to achieve gender equality in science
"Why women are paid less" Interview with Francine Blau, professor of labor economics, Cornell University. As raised in one of the presidential debates, women are still paid less than men. Read this article for Dr. Blau's perspective on potential reasons for this.
Science faculty's subtle gender bias favors male students
This study
from Princeton University showed that science faculty (regardless of gender) rating students applying for a laboratory supervisor position ranked male applicants more highly and offered male applicants a higher starting salary and more mentoring than female counterparts.
American Woman Who Shattered Space Ceiling
Article about Sally Ride, the first American woman to fly in space.
Slaughter (2012): Why Women Still Can Have it All (theatlantic.com) Sobering article regarding the difficulties of women juggling work-life balance and the compromises or choices they have to make. (article available through CU library or Internal Resources)

More and archived news items here