Baker Institute for Animal Health

DEDICATED TO THE STUDY OF VETERINARY INFECTIOUS DISEASES, IMMUNOLOGY, CANCER, REPRODUCTION, GENOMICS AND EPIGENOMICS

Schang elected for board of International Society of Antiviral Research

The members of the International Society of Antiviral Research (ISAR), an internationally recognized, interdisciplinary organization of scientists working towards the development of antiviral drugs, have elected the Baker Institute’s Dr. Luis Schang as a member of their board.

“I have benefited enormously from belonging to ISAR,” said Schang, a professor of Chemical Virology at Cornell University. “I am very happy to have the opportunity now to help the society in my new position as one of the members of the board, and very humbled that my colleagues have elected me to this position.”

Schang first joined the society in 2000. He became a member of the publications committee in 2007 and is now one of the committee’s co-chairs. Schang also serves as an ISAR Ambassador and volunteers on the posters awards committee.

Additionally, Schang has forged several research collaborations with ISAR members through his work on the discovery and development of antiviral compounds. At the Baker Institute, Schang’s group is investigating small “drug-like” molecules that interfere with the ability of viruses to infect cells – a research approach that naturally aligns with ISAR’s mission. The small molecules identified by his lab can be used to study the interactions between viruses and cells, to find commonalities among unrelated viruses and provide scaffolds to explore new avenues for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals.

During his three-year term, Schang and his fellow board members will help oversee ISAR finances, approve bylaws, supervise the society’s committees, and help in planning its annual meeting, the International Conference on Antiviral Research. Schang is also involved in some major changes to the official newsletter, and brings some new ideas for how the society can help its members and advance antiviral development.

“I want to help the society to keep on thriving,” said Schang, “and to enhance its mission to support and foster antiviral discovery, a critical role for the society.”

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