Ambulatory Training Program

The Ambulatory and Production Medicine Clinic has three house officer positions which are filled with either interns or residents, depending on applicant qualifications. Veterinarians interested in these positions can get more information by contacting Dr. Jessica McArt. Past participants in the internship program have usually continued with an Ambulatory or hospital-based residency or pursued careers in private clinical practice. Residency program participants have often received board certification from the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, the American College of Theriogenologists, or the American College of Veterinary Preventive Veterinary Medicine and some have subsequently completed M.S. or Ph.D. programs. Many former residents are now employed in academia or industry.

INTERNSHIP IN AMBULATORY AND PRODUCTION MEDICINE AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, ITHACA, NY

The section of Ambulatory and Production Medicine at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine is soliciting applications for a one-year internship in ambulatory and production medicine beginning June 13, 2022 and ending July 23, 2023. Application materials must be received electronically by 5PM EST, Teusday, November 30, 2021. Following review of all applications, we may invite a select number of applicants for an online interview. We will offer the position to the successful candidate on or before January 7, 2022.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Cornell offers its interns a unique combination of clinical and academic experience, providing additional clinical experience for large animal practice or for application to residency programs. The Ambulatory and Production Medicine Clinic makes about 4,000 farm calls and sees approximately 50,000 animals per year within a 25-mile radius of Ithaca, New York. There are 4 faculty in support of the program with expertise in dairy production medicine, equine primary care, and small ruminants. The Ambulatory and Production Medicine faculty clinicians (Drs. Mary Smith, Jessica McArt, Sabine Mann, and Qiudi Zheng) oversee 3 house officers (interns/residents) within the program.

The intern position requires an interest and familiarity with all large animal species including cattle, horses, goats, sheep, camelids, and pigs. This position offers a wide range of training experiences that focus on the primary care of all large animal species. This is not an equine specialty nor a bovine exclusive training program – it will provide the intern with good exposure to all large animals. Clientele range from pet to production small ruminants and pigs, pasture to performance horses, and 40-cow tie-stall dairies to 5,000-cow free-stall dairies. Daytime cases seen by the intern are approximately 70% horses, 15% cattle, and 15% small ruminants. After-hours emergencies are 50% equine and 50% ruminant.

Our intern program provides approximately 30% supervision – this program is best suited for an independent learner. After individual training with faculty clinicians for the first month of the program, the intern is assigned a vehicle and a group of veterinary students and begins performing ambulatory calls assigned and supervised by the clinician in charge. This supervision is provided in-person or via phone. Interns will conduct ambulatory calls 4 week days per week with an additional day for client communication, scholarly activities, specialty training opportunities, and research projects. Interns are required to share weekend duty and be responsible for emergency service on a rotating basis; this equates to 1-2 evenings per week and 1 out of 3 weekends on call. A faculty clinician is available at all times for back-up emergency support.

The intern is expected to lead student rounds once per week and attend a mandatory weekly journal club with other clinicians in the section. In addition, the intern is encouraged to attend large animal grand rounds offered once every 8 weeks in collaboration with all other large animal clinical sections. Attendance at other seminar or elective coursework is considered at the discretion of the Ambulatory and Production Medicine Section Chief. Time off and financial support is provided for each intern to attend a continuing education meeting during the year. Upon satisfactory completion of the internship, a “Certificate of Internship” is awarded.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

The objectives of our program include intern development of a high level of experience and clinical proficiency with primary care of all large animal species, acquisition of experience in veterinary education through clinical and didactic teaching, development of critical thinking skills, and experience in collaborative clinical research.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS & SUBMISSION

The requirements for application are as follows:

  • DVM or international veterinary equivalent degree
  • Driver’s license valid in the USA
  • Comfort handling, restraining, and moving large animals
  • Ability to lift 50 pounds
  • US permanent resident, Canadian citizen, or foreign national holding a valid employment authorization document (no other visa or employment sponsorship is currently available through Cornell; for questions, please contact Pilar Thompson at pav37@cornell.edu).

To submit an application, email the following materials to cuha-residency@cornell.edu attention Amanda Hakes, by 5PM EST, Tuesday, November 30, 2021, in .pdf format:

  1. A personal statement describing the applicant’s background, reasons for applying for this internship, and career goals (max. 1 page).
  2. Curriculum vitae with names and contact information for 3 professional references.
  3. Request 3 professional references to send letters directly to Attn: Amanda Hakes at cuha-residency@cornell.edu.
  4. Official transcripts including grade point average from all post-secondary institutions attended and your class rank in veterinary school. An officially certified English language translation of each must be included, in addition, if the original is in another language. Official transcripts should be sent electronically from the University Registrar’s Office to Attn: Amanda Hakes at cuha-residency@cornell.edu.
  5. English proficiency must be provided by applicants from countries where English is not an official language. Acceptable proofs are: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) minimum 100 (internet based, http://www.ets.org/toefl/) and minimum of 600 (paper exam) or IETLS, minimum 7.

Questions regarding the intern application process or program should be directed to Dr. Jessica McArt at jmcart@cornell.edu. Additional information can be found on our website

RESIDENCY IN AMBULATORY AND PRODUCTION MEDICINE AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, ITHACA, NY

The section of Ambulatory and Production Medicine at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine is soliciting applications for two positions in a two-year residency in ambulatory and production medicine beginning July 11, 2022 and ending August 18, 2024. Application materials must be received electronically by 5PM EST, Tuesday, November 30, 2021. Following review of all applications, we may invite a select number of applicants for an online interview. We will offer the position to the successful candidate on or before January 7, 2022.

Given the nature of our practice area, residents should apply for one of two focus areas: 1) production animal or 2) mixed large animal.

Production Animal Position

• Our production animal focused resident position requires an interest in and experience with dairy cattle, which is the emphasis of the program for this position. However, production-focused residents are required to work with and enjoy practicing on all large animal species including cattle, horses, goats, sheep, camelids, and pigs. This position offers a wide range of training experiences with a focus on herd-level dairy management in addition to individual cow health with additional training in primary equine, small ruminant, and pig health. Dairy clientele range from numerous 40-cow tie-stall dairies to a 5,000 cow free-stall herd. Residency training will focus on individual animal health, surgeries, and dystocias with training in dairy record management, herd reproductive programs, milk quality, transition cow health, protocol development, and farm employee training. Additional cases range from pet to production small ruminants and pigs, and pasture to performance horses. Daytime cases seen by the resident are approximately 70% cattle, 15% equine, and 15% small ruminant. After-hours and weekend emergencies are 50% equine and 50% ruminant.

Mixed Large Animal Position

• Our mixed large animal focused resident position requires an interest and familiarity with all large animal species including cattle, horses, goats, sheep, camelids, and pigs. This position offers a wide range of training experiences that focus on the primary care of all large animal species and additional training in bovine reproductive work and surgeries. This is not an equine specialty nor a bovine exclusive training program – it will provide the resident with good exposure to all large animals. Clientele range from pet to production small ruminants and pigs, pasture to performance horses, and 40-cow tie-stall dairies to 5,000-cow free-stall dairies. Daytime cases seen by the resident are approximately 70% horses, 15% cattle, and 15% small ruminants. After-hours emergencies are 50% equine and 50% ruminant.

Our residency program provides approximately 30% supervision– these positions are best suited for independent learners. After individual training with faculty clinicians for the first month of the program, each resident is assigned a vehicle and a group of veterinary students and begins performing ambulatory calls assigned and supervised by the clinician in charge. This supervision is provided in-person or via phone. Residents will conduct ambulatory calls 4 days per week with an additional day for client communication, scholarly activities, specialty training opportunities, and research projects. Residents are required to share weekend duty and be responsible for emergency service on a rotating basis; this equates to 1-2 evenings per week and 1 out of 3 weekends on call. A faculty clinician is available at all times for back-up emergency support.

The resident is expected to lead student rounds once per week and attend a mandatory weekly journal club with other clinicians in the section. In addition, the resident is required to attend large animal grand rounds offered once every 8 weeks in collaboration with all other large animal clinical sections. Attendance at other seminars or elective coursework is considered at the discretion of the Ambulatory and Production Medicine Section Chief. Completion of a research project, mentored by one of the Ambulatory faculty clinicians, is required during the program. Time off and financial support is provided for each resident to attend a continuing education meeting per year. Upon satisfactory completion of the residency, a “Certificate of Residency” is awarded. Previous residents have sought board certification in the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, Dairy Practice or the American College of Theriogenologists upon completion of the program.


PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

Our resident program objectives include development of a high level of experience and clinical proficiency with primary care of all large animal species, advanced experience and proficiency with dairy production medicine (production-focused position), acquisition of experience in veterinary education through clinical and didactic teaching, development of critical thinking skills, and experience in clinical research from project development through manuscript preparation and submission.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS & SUBMISSION

The requirements for application are as follows:

  • DVM or international veterinary equivalent degree
  • At least one year of clinical experience at the start of the residency program
  • Driver’s license valid in the USA
  • Comfort handling, restraining, and moving large animals
  • Ability to lift 50 pounds
  • US permanent resident, Canadian citizen, or foreign national holding a valid employment authorization document (no other visa or employment sponsorship is currently available through Cornell; for questions, please contact Pilar Thompson at pav37@cornell.edu).

To submit an application, email the following materials to cuha-residency@cornell.edu attention Amanda Hakes, by 5PM EST, Tuesday, November 30, 2021, in .pdf format:

1) A personal statement describing the applicant’s background, reasons for applying for this internship, and career goals (max. 1 page).
2) Curriculum vitae with names and contact information for 3 professional references.
3) Request 3 professional references to send letters directly to Attn: Amanda Hakes at cuha-residency@cornell.edu
4) Official transcripts including grade point average from all post-secondary institutions attended and your class rank in veterinary school. An officially certified English language translation of each must be included, in addition, if the original is in another language. Official transcripts should be sent electronically from the University Registrar’s Office to Attn: Amanda Hakes at cuha-residency@cornell.edu.
5) English proficiency must be provided by applicants from countries where English is not an official language. Acceptable proofs are: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) minimum 100 (internet based, http://www.ets.org/toefl/) and minimum of 600 (paper exam) or IETLS, minimum 7.

Questions regarding the resident application process or program should be directed to Dr. Jessica McArt at jmcart@cornell.edu. Additional information can be found on our website