Paul Soloway, PhD

Paul Soloway, PhD

Department of Biomedical Sciences

Professor of Molecular Genetics
Chair

Lab Website


Department of Biomedical Sciences
Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine
T4 018 Veterinary Research Tower
Ithaca, NY 14853-6401

Office: 607-253-3336
Fax: 607-253-4447
Email: soloway@cornell.edu

Research Interest

Over the years, my lab has used the laboratory mouse as a model to characterize gene function, and genome regulation in mammals.  Our genome regulation interests have focused on epigenetic mechanisms.  Whereas genetic mechanisms involve control of gene expression and inherited traits by DNA sequences, with epigenetic mechanisms, factors like chemical modifications to DNA and histones, and nucleosome positioning are operating.  These factors collectively define the chromatin state of a cell.  Unlike DNA sequences that generally do not vary within an individual, chromatin states vary from cell to cell, can change over the life-span, and respond to environmental exposures.  Accordingly, these epigenetic or chromatin-based mechanisms may influence health and disease states associated with aging, lifestyle, and environmental stressors.  Additionally, these mechanisms can both respond to, and influence genetic variables that affect health and disease. 

Current efforts use genetically-modified, and environmentally-manipulated mice to model various health and disease states that are seen in human, and use single cell methods to characterize chromatin states in affected tissues.  The goals of these studies are to identify the various cell types that exist in tissues, and how their abundances and chromatin states change with health and disease state.  These provide insights into the cellular and molecular bases of health and disease.  Among the systems being studied are mouse models for Down syndrome, adipose development and metabolism, heart disease, and melanoma.  Additional systems under investigation are immunodeficiencies in veterinary species, and insect vectors for infectious disease.

Education

  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Whitehead Institute, 1990-1994 (Advisor: Rudolf Jaenisch)
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Biology, MIT 1990-1994 (Advisor: Malcolm Gefter)
  • PhD, Molecular Biology, Princeton University, 1989 (Advisor: Thomas E. Shenk)
  • BA, Department of Biochemistry, Cornell University, 1979

Biography/Professional Experience

  • 2017-Present     Professor of Molecular Genetics and Chair, Dept. of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2005-Present     Professor, Division of Nutritional Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2002-2005     Associate Professor, Division of Nutritional Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2002-2005     Adjunct Member, Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY
  • 1999-2002     Cancer Research Scientist IV, Associate Member, Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology; Director, Transgenic and Gene Targeting Facility, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY
  • 1998-1999     Cancer Research Scientist IV, Assistant Member, Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY
  • 1994-1998     Cancer Research Scientist III, Assistant Member, Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY
  • 1979-1981     Lab Technician, Dept. of Agricultural Engineering, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Publications

Professional/Academic Affiliations

  • Scientific Advisory Board Member, Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics
  • Editorial Board, Frontiers in Nutrigenomics
  • Member, NIH GHD Study Section

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