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Past Events: 2024

Full listing

Quality Milk Production Services in the Animal Health Diagnostic Center presents “Moo-ving forward with lessons from studying mastitis and metabolic health in dairy cows” by Dr. Luciano Caixeta, Associate Professor of Dairy Production Medicine at the University of Minnesota on Wednesday, July 17 at 9am at the College of Veterinary Medicine in Powell Classroom 6 (S1-222).

Meet our paw-some veterinarians by joining us in this upcoming webinar on Canine Lymphoma.

This session will provide an overview of the many different presentations of canine lymphoma. Options for treatment will be discussed with a focus on novel canine-specific medications. Lastly, findings from clinical trials on alternatives to chemotherapy will be presented.

Learning objectives

Describe the mechanism of action for Tanovea® and Laverdia®-CA1.

List possible adverse reactions to Tanovea® and Laverdia®-CA1.

Describe the efficacy of Tanovea® and Laverdia®-CA1.

List possible side...

Women play important roles in preventing foodborne diseases throughout the food system, from agricultural production and food processing to vending and home meal preparation. Understanding gender dynamics in value chains and households can inform more effective food safety practices, policies, and outreach. This webinar will share insights from Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety projects on engaging and empowering women in aquaculture (Bangladesh), produce production (Cambodia), and household food safety (Nigeria).

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This conference will focus on teaching approaches that encourage and support veterinary students’ reflection on their learning experiences, and the development of lifelong learning skills through self-regulated learning. These will be examined in the context of both classroom settings and the clinical learning environment, and the implications for students’ academic achievement, the development of clinical skills, and wellbeing will be considered. Keynote speakers will address topics such as narrative medicine, principles of self-regulated learning, metacognition, feedback, and evaluation.

This conference will focus on teaching approaches that encourage and support veterinary students’ reflection on their learning experiences, and the development of lifelong learning skills through self-regulated learning. These will be examined in the context of both classroom settings and the clinical learning environment, and the implications for students’ academic achievement, the development of clinical skills, and wellbeing will be considered. Keynote speakers will address topics such as narrative medicine, principles of self-regulated learning, metacognition, feedback, and evaluation.

Progress in food safety is driven by behavior change. A better understanding of the beliefs, motivations, and economic pressures that influence food safety behaviors can yield more effective outreach programs and policy recommendations. This webinar will provide insights from Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety projects on food safety and social behavioral change among consumers, producers, and vendors in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Nepal, and Senegal.

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Guest speaker Emily Gurley, PhD, MPH is a Professor of the Practice in the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research involves novel surveillance strategies, improved collaboration between field epidemiologists and infectious disease modelers, and emerging and vaccine preventable disease transmission and prevention. Emily is Co-Director of Child Health and Mortality Prevention Surveillance in Bangladesh and the Bangladesh Society for Public Health’s faculty co-lead for the Surveillance and Outbreak Response Team.

Cornell Immunology Symposium

June 3-5, 2024, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY

Organizers: Drs. Mandy McGeachy & Melody Zeng

Keynote Speakers:

Donna Farber, Ph.D., Columbia University

Greg M. Delgoffe, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

The 3rd Cornell Immunology Symposium will bring together the expertise of scientists and trainees from both campuses to address the most recent and exciting advances in Immunology.

***Transportation& accommodation for all Weill Cornell Medicine participants will be provided.

***We encourage students and postdocs to submit abstracts for...

Register here

TUESDAY MAY 21

Session 1: AMR Education and Communication

“Breaking Down Barriers to Sustainable Antimicrobial Use in Cats”Amelia Greiner Safi and Casey Cazer"Influences of scientific storytelling and visual narratives on antimicrobial resistance"Meghan McGillin and Megan Keller“Bridging borders, battling bacteria: The UK's AMR National Action Plan and its international efforts across research, policy, and education” Garrett DunlapSession Keynote

"All the mutants we could not see: Deep mutagenesis of antibiotic binding-site"

Dr. Aviram Rasouly, Senior Research Scientist...

Title: "Far From Home: T Cell Migration Through Non-Lymphoid Tissues"

By: Susan Schwab, NYU Grossman School of Medicine

Title: "Human Antibodies for Emerging Infectious Diseases"

By: James Crowe, Vanderbilt University

"Pathogenesis of enteric fever"

Salmonella Typhi and Paratyphi cause a prolonged illness known as enteric fever, whereas other Salmonella serovars cause gastroenteritis. Emergent multidrug resistance has increased the challenge posed by Salmonella infections, particularly in Asia and Africa. This presentation will describe new insights into pathogenic mechanisms of S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A that distinguish them from nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars.

Biography:

Ferric C. Fang, M.D. is a Professor of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology and Medicine at the University of Washington School of...

Title: "Interorgan Communication in Host Defense"

By: Matt Waldor, Harvard University

Most existing and emerging infectious diseases have their origin in animal populations. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic the need to understand the cause and impacts of wildlife diseases, as well as how to manage them, has only become increasingly salient.

Join us for a live, hybrid Chats in the Stacks book talk with Robin Radcliffe, associate professor of practice in Wildlife and Conservation Medicine in the Veterinary School, and David Jessup, former senior wildlife veterinarian of the California Department of Fish and Game and former executive manager of the Wildlife Disease...

“Two-component regulatory systems and antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae”

Biography:

Dr. Anne-Catrin Uhlemann is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, where she also directs the CUIMC Microbiome & Pathogen Collaborative Center and the Columbia University O’Brien Center for Benign Urology. She completed her medical training at the Eberhard-Karls-University in Tubingen, Germany and received her PhD from the University of London, UK. Dr. Uhlemann completed her residency in Internal Medicine and...

"The Economics of Pandemic Prevention and Control: An Overview"

We will discuss the epi-econ approach, which combines epidemiological and economic modeling to address some of the shortcomings of traditional epidemiological models, notably the absence of explicit modeling of incentives and of strategic behavior by individuals and by policy-makers. These models treat pandemic spillover as an exogenous shock. Yet, unlike earthquakes or asteroid events, pandemic emergence results partly from human activities, including value chains for livestock, farming and hunting, tourism in wild landscapes...

Celebrating our 11th year of dance, the CVM Dance Collective is proud to present our annual spring showcase, held on Saturday, April 27th at Hangar Theatre. Featuring a variety of dances from tap and contemporary to reggae and swing, join us for a night of creativity, music, and fun! Doors open at 7 pm, and the show starts at 7:30 pm.

Title: "Antibodies and Their Receptors: Coupling Innate and Adaptive Immunity"

By: Jeffrey Ravetch, The Rockefeller University

"The aldehyde hypothesis”

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a human-exclusive pathogen, is arguably the deadliest microbe on the planet. While SARS-CoV-2 killed more people than M. tuberculosis for a year or two, it is estimated M. tuberculosishas killed 1-2 million people yearly for millennia. The long coexistence of this bacterial species with humans has likely resulted in the selection of host and pathogen populations that prevent either's extinction. We propose that reactive aldehydes produced in metabolic pathways are exploited during certain microbial infections. While there has been a...

“Can we stop the next pandemic by preventing spillover?”