Open Studies

Canine Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma: A Translational Research Approach

The Cornell Veterinary Biobank is dedicated to promoting research to improve detection and treatment of dogs with lymphoma, improving life expectancy and quality for our companions. As part of this project, the Biobank is also committed to creating innovations for precision medicine and exploring how advances in our understanding of canine diffuse large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) can improve the lives of Lymphoma patients.

If you own a dog that has been diagnosed with lymphoma but has not yet begun treatment, you can help us with this study.

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Progress has been slow to improve therapies and outcomes for dogs diagnosed with a very common tumor – lymphoma. To accelerate our understanding of this cancer and identify novel treatments to improve survival, we are collecting blood samples from dogs diagnosed with lymphoma that have not yet begun chemotherapy for their cancer. The Cornell Veterinary Biobank has a collective vision to centralize high quality samples to be applied in clinical cancer research. Your animal’s biobanked samples will be used to identify ways to improve disease detection, prognosis, and treatment options for dogs with lymphoma.

Not only is participation vital for the advancement of veterinary medicine, but your dogs’ samples have the potential to aid in translational cancer projects. The canine lymphoma model is viewed as a possible bridge in the gap surrounding targeted human cancer therapy. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans shares many of the same characteristics of DLBCL in dogs. Utilizing comparative oncology to advance work in biomarkers, expansion of genomic data, and immunotherapy gives a unique hope for the future of precision medicine, particularly for lymphoma patients.

You can help us!

Canine patients are eligible for enrollment if they have been diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and have not yet received chemotherapy from their veterinarian. Dogs that have received prednisone or doxycycline would still qualify for a sample donation.

Contact us for more information or if you would like to schedule an appointment.

Owners Responsibility:

We ask you to please read the provided informed consent form and informational materials; if consent is given to take a blood sample for research and to access the dog’s medical records, the sample will be collected during the visit to CUHA. No other participation is required.


Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease Study

Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, also known as avascular necrosis of the femoral head, is an important condition caused by the disruption of blood flow to the ball of the femur – or femoral head.  This is both a canine and human pediatric condition.  This project is studying canine Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, hoping to develop a genetic test that will reduce the incidence of these diseases in dogs.

If you own a dog that has been diagnosed with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, you can help us with this study.

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The Cornell Veterinary Biobank is recruiting blood samples from dogs diagnosed with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, also known as avascular necrosis of the femoral head, for their genetics database.  

By identifying the predisposition for this disease at an early stage, researchers will be able to lower its incidence and impact the health of future generations by stopping the propagation of genes that are diminishing the quality of life in dogs.

Owners of eligible patients please send 2-3 ml of EDTA blood (can be left over blood sent immediately from a completed CBC) along with the diagnosis confirmation from pelvic radiographs. Shipping boxes may be provided by the Biobank team.  For additional information or to obtain shipping boxes please contact the Cornell Veterinary Biobank at 607-253-3060 or e-mail us.

Compensation: The study pays for a shipping box for sample to be mailed to the Biobank, or a single blood sample to be taken at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA) for research purposes only. Other tests or procedures required as part of patient care are not covered by the study and remain the responsibility of the owner.

Owner Responsibility: The owner may ship a blood sample to the Biobank or a sample may be taken during a visit to CUHA.  If an CUHA visit, the owner shall read all provided consent and informational materials; if consent is given to take a blood sample for research and to access the dog’s medical records, the sample will be collected during the visit to CUHA or at the referring veterinarian. No other participation is required.

Contact us for more information or if you would like to schedule an appointment.


Targeted Therapies for Canine Hemangiosarcomas

Hemangiosarcomas (HSA) are a common type of cancer in dogs, resulting in about 2 million dog deaths per year in the U.S. This study aims to find and test new drugs that can prevent tumor growth.

If you own a dog who has been diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma and and is having surgery to remove the tumor in the Ithaca area, he/she is eligible for this study.

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Hemangiosarcomas (HSA) are common and highly aggressive tumors in dogs, representing ~6% of all tumors seen in dogs. An estimated 2 million dogs succumb to this disease per year in the United States. Disease recurrence following removal of the primary tumor mass is common and new drugs are needed to prevent relapse. Therefore, the long-term goals of this project are to identify better procedures/drugs to treat canine hemangiosarcoma and to test the ability of newer targeted drugs in preventing tumor growth or recurrence.

Compensation: The study pays for a single blood sample to be taken for research purposes only. Other tests or procedures required as part of patient care are not covered by the study and remain the responsibility of the owner.

Owner Responsibility: Following surgical removal of tumor tissue, a small piece of the tumor is normally removed from the mass for clinical diagnostic testing by a pathologist. For our studies, we will use an additional piece of the tumor. Therefore, the only responsibility for the owner is that they consent to having this additional piece of tissue taken from the tumor mass for research purposes. 

Contact us for more information or if you would like to schedule an appointment.

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