Skip to main content

Molecular Diagnostics

The Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and facilities including high-throughput automated extraction and liquid handling systems and a variety of platforms for PCR and next-generation sequencing. We operate within a Quality Assurance System that complies with the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians. The lab also undergoes proficiency testing conducted by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory and the US Food and Drug Administration.

Order Molecular Diagnostics Tests

Services

Clinical Testing

We offer tests for a wide variety of infectious disease agents and several genetic assays.

Results for most routine clinical testing are provided in the following format (please see our Johne’s testing page for specific interpretations for the Johne's direct fecal PCR):

  • Not detected
  • Low positive – Previously called "suspect," this indicates that the pathogen was detected but at a level that was so low that it may not be reproducible.
  • Moderate positive
  • High positive
  • Inconclusive – This indicates that the presence or absence of the pathogen could not be determined due to inhibitors present in the sample.

These interpretations are based on the Ct value obtained by tests performed using real-time PCR. We no longer provide the raw Ct values routinely due to the differing ranges produced by our platforms and have replaced this with the interpretations above. If you would like to know the Ct value for a clinical specimen, please contact us.

STAT Testing Procedures

Results for most infectious disease PCR tests are reported 1 or 2 business days after the sample is received. Specific information for each test is provided in our test catalog. A list of STAT-eligible molecular tests, turnaround times, and instructions is available at: https://www.vet.cornell.edu/animal-health-diagnostic-center/testing/stat-testing.

Formalin-fixed samples may be submitted for most PCR tests and will incur a $20 surcharge. These are not eligible for STAT testing

Surveillance Testing

As a level I NAHLN lab, we perform surveillance testing for avian influenza virus, avian paramyxovirus-1/Exotic Newcastle Disease, foot and mouth disease virus and classical swine fever virus. We also participate in the FDA Vet-LIRN and GenomeTrakr networks to improve pet food safety and outbreak response capacity.

In cooperation with our Bacteriology section, we perform Johne's direct fecal PCR testing for the New York State Cattle Health Assurance Program (NYSCHAP) and Salmonella Environmental Surveillance for animal facilities.

People

Please direct all molecular testing queries to ahdc_mol_mgmt@cornell.edu or (607) 253-3900.

Laura Goodman, PhD
Interim Director, Molecular Diagnostics

John Beeby
Laboratory Manager

Research

Research and development is part of the mission of the AHDC at Cornell. The Molecular Diagnostics Section is available to collaborate with you to develop new or improve existing test methods and reagents, investigate specific problems or provide customized testing to meet your needs. As an academic lab, we are eager to form collaborations with other researchers and provide support for a wide variety of projects. Please contact us to discuss the specific needs for your project.

Several recent publications highlighting work that we have contributed to include:

  • McDonagh et al. Frequent human-poultry interactions and low prevalence of Salmonella in backyard chicken flocks in Massachusetts. Zoonoses and Public Health 2019
  • Voorhees et al. Multiple Incursions and Recurrent Epidemic Fade-Out of H3N2 Canine Influenza A Virus in the United States. Journal of Virology 2018
  • Goodman et al. Detection of Salmonella spp. in veterinary samples by combining selective enrichment and real-time PCR. Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation 2017
  • Manjunatha et al. A Cryptosporidium PI(4)K inhibitor is a drug candidate for cryptosporidiosis. Nature 2017
  • Wagner et al. Neonatal Immunization with a Single IL-4/Antigen Dose Induces Increased Antibody Responses after Challenge Infection with Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 (EHV-1) at Weanling Age. PLoS One 2017
  • Goodman et al. High-throughput Detection of Respiratory Pathogens in Animal Specimens by Nanoscale PCR. Journal of Visualized Experiments 2016

Share this: