Ensure exceptional clinical care with the best training and tools.

Judy Wilpon
Judy Wilpon

When the Twin Towers fell on 9-11, Judy Wilpon knew she needed to help somehow. She brought Lefty, her almost two-year-old therapy dog, to comfort first responders and their families. “He just knew who needed a hug, or a warm furry kiss on the cheek, or a head on their lap,” says Judy. “He was just amazing. He was my best friend.” Many years later Lefty fell victim to hemangiosarcoma, a deadly canine cancer that had taken many of Judy’s other golden retrievers.  “It’s a far-too-common cancer in dogs, and deserves active and immediate research,” says Judy. “We’ve had goldens for thirty years, and all have had gone through some kind of cancer,” she says.

Through her pets’ health struggles, Judy was introduced to the college thanks to her local veterinarian, Dr. Hank Travis, ’70, D.V.M. ’74. “He was a Cornell Vet graduate and a great advocate for Cornell. He also served on the Baker Institute’s advisory council and as director,” Judy says.

Since that first introduction many years ago, Judy and her husband, Fred Wilpon, have been generous supporters of the college and its efforts. One of their recent gifts has been close to their hearts: endowing a resident in oncology at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals. The gift establishes a permanent position for a talented veterinarian to pursue specialized training in studying and treating cancer. With the position fully endowed, the hospital will now always be able to ensure a place for a top-notch resident to practice world-class animal oncology.Our biomedical research has evolved from early days of pipettes and petri dishes to powerful sequencing technologies and gene editing capabilities that have revealed brand-new insights in areas such as biological and molecular medicine and genomics.

“I can make a difference by helping our Cornell students and clinicians have the best equipment, technology and facilities at their fingertips. Supporting their success makes me take great pride in Cornell’s impact on pets and the people who care for them.”

Judy Wilpon

“I believe the only way to solve our biggest animal and human health issues is through education, and supporting the institutions that provide it,” says Judy. “If we are not supporting and ensuring that educational organizations can train the healers of tomorrow, we won’t be able to support our animals.”

With medical knowledge and technology constantly advancing, the college must invest in cutting-edge tools and top-notch facilities in which to train our veterinary students and provide our patients with the most advanced medicine.

“Animals are such an integral part of our families and communities,” says Judy, “and we should be doing all we can to help them live longer, happier lives. I can make a difference by helping our Cornell students and clinicians have the best equipment, technology and facilities at their fingertips. Supporting their success makes me take great pride in Cornell’s impact on pets and the people who care for them.”

Your gifts in support of breakthrough research, high-quality diagnostic and clinical equipment, and state-of-the-art facilities will define our role as a leader in training and patient care for years to come.